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SEA WEEK: OCEAN FILM SERIES

Various days and times, please bring a small koha if you can

5 days, 01:30 PM - 03:00 PM

CWEA, Christchurch

Session information

Sessions

A Plastic Ocean by Plastic Oceans International, 2016
13:30 - 15:00
1 hour, 30 minutes
CWEA, Christchurch
    Eating up Easter by Plastic Oceans INternational, 2018
    13:30 - 15:00
    1 hour, 30 minutes
    CWEA, Christchurch
      Shark Water Extinction – 2018
      10:00 - 11:30
      1 hour, 30 minutes
      CWEA, Christchurch
        The Last Ocean - Peter Young, 2012
        13:30 - 15:00
        1 hour, 30 minutes
        CWEA, Christchurch
          • Free

          Description

          A PLASTIC OCEAN – Plastic Oceans International, 2016: In the centre of the Pacific Ocean gyre researchers found more plastic than plankton. A Plastic Ocean documents how plastics, once they enter the oceans, break up into small particulates that enter the food chain where they attract toxins like a magnet. These toxins are stored in seafood’s fatty tissues, and eventually consumed by us.

          EATING UP EASTER – Plastic Ocean International, 2018: Native Rapanui (Easter Island) filmmaker Sergio Mata’u Rapu narrates to his son the modern dilemma of their people who risk losing everything to the globalizing effects of tourism.

          SHARK WATER EXTINCTION – 2018: Thrilling and inspiring action packed journey that follows filmmaker Rob Stewart as he exposes the massive illegal shark fin industry and the political corruption behind it — a conspiracy that is leading to the extinction of sharks.

          THE LAST OCEAN – Peter Young, 2012: The Ross Sea, Antarctica is the most pristine stretch of ocean on Earth. A vast, frozen landscape that teems with life – whales, seals and penguins carving out a place on the very edge of existence. Californian ecologist David Ainley has been traveling to the Ross Sea to study this unique ecosystem for more than thirty years. Largely untouched by humans, it is one of the last places where the delicate balance of nature prevails. But an international fishing fleet has recently found its way to the Ross Sea. It is targeting Antarctic toothfish, sold as Chilean sea bass in up-market restaurants around the world.