Close
214-34%20-%20william%20morris.jpg

WOMEN IN THE WILLIAM MORRIS AND PRE-RAPHAELITE CIRCLES -Martin Crick

Starts 16th August, 12.30-2pm, 4 Tuesdays, $32

Discount

4 weeks, 12:30 PM - 02:00 PM

CWEA, Christchurch

Session information

Sessions

Session 1
12:30 - 14:00
1 hour, 30 minutes
CWEA, Christchurch
    Session 2
    12:30 - 14:00
    1 hour, 30 minutes
    CWEA, Christchurch
      Session 3
      12:30 - 14:00
      1 hour, 30 minutes
      CWEA, Christchurch
        Session 4
        12:30 - 14:00
        1 hour, 30 minutes
        CWEA, Christchurch
          • With Membership discount $30.00 incl. GST
          • with Life Membership discount $30.00 incl. GST
          • $32.00 incl. GST

          Description

          Male artists dominate the accounts of the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, with women largely identified either as wives, daughters, or family members, and thus destined for domesticity, or as models, and thus rather disreputable. They were  constrained by gender to occupy a separate sphere and they have been ‘hidden from history’. Yet they were active in all phases of the movement, providing the inspiration for many of the Pre-Raphaelites, and in some cases they were artists themselves. They managed the business affairs of the artists, promoted them, wrote reviews of their work, and they managed their homes and looked after their families. In these lectures Martin hopes to provide a re-assessment of these women via an examination of their private and public lives, placing them within the context of prevailing Victorian mores. This course is a repeat  Martin's  four-part series on 'Women in the Pre-Raphaelite and William Morris Circles', not the series on Morris himself.

          Session 1. Jane Morris

          Session 2. May Morris

          Sessions 3 and 4 Pre-Raphaelite women.

          Martin Crick is the former Trustee of the William Morris Society; a course leader in Arts Education at Bretton Hall College, University of Leeds. He is also author of The History of the Social-Democratic Federation (1994), and A History of the William Morris Society (2011).